Programming your Yaesu FT60 HT radio

I jotted down these notes a few years back to refer back to later. The trouble I’ve found with all HT radios is you work through the manual to setup a couple of local repeaters and then months (years!) go by and you can’t remember how you did it last time 🙂

Here’s my notes for setting up memories in your FT60:

To toggle freq VFO/memory mode:

  • bottom left button: V/M

To store current settings to a memory:

Set the current frequency, and for repeaters the offset, PL tone etc and then store all the currently selected settings to a memory:

  • hold bottom right FW
  • flashing mem is an empty slot
  • press bottom right (FW) again, stores in slot
  • switch to memory mode (toggle v/m button)
  • FW 0 selects menus
  • select 28 nm write, press FW to select
  • press FW again to select 1st char, rotate dial to select, up arrow to move to next char
  • if you get to last char it stores automatically, otherwise for less than max chars press ptr to enter to memory

To delete a memory:

  • go to memory mode, select memory
  • hold FW
  • select memory with knob
  • press hm/rv – deletes mem

Toggle memory freq display

In memory mode, press Band – toggles to freq & tune mode

Press again to toggle back to memories

Differences between US and UK Amateur Radio license rules and restrictions – part 3: Callsigns

Continuing my posts looking at the differences between US and UK amateur radio licenses (part 1, part 2), I’m now taking a look at callsigns.

In the US, callsigns are assigned using the following format (described in FCC doc here):

Technician

For regions 1 through 10:

  • K, N or W prefix + additional letter + region 1 through 10 + 3 letter suffix (aka 2 by 3)
  • Other regions beyond 10 have slight variations in the prefix, such as KH for Hawaii (Region 13)

General

For regions 1 through 10:

  • K, N or W prefix + region 1 through 10 + 3 letter suffix (aka 1 by 3
  • Other regions beyond 10 have slight variations in the prefix, such as KH for Hawaii (Region 13)

Amateur Extra

For regions 1 through 10:

  • K, N or W prefix + region 1 through 10 + 2 letter suffix (aka 1 by 2)
  • 2 letter prefix starting A, N, W or M + region + 1 letter suffix (aka 2 by 1)
  • 2 letter prefix starting A + region + 2 letter suffix (aka 2 by 2)
  • Other regions have slight variations in prefix

UK Licences

For UK licenses there are similar differences between Foundation, Intermediate and Full, but with the addition of a required ‘Regional Secondary Locator’ (RSL) character to indicate the country where you are transmitting from:

Foundation License

Prefix starts:

  • M#3
  • M#6
  • M#7

… where # is the placeholder for the RSL. Interestingly, the UK licenses are issued showing the # where you are expected to substitute your RSL yourself.

RSLs used are:

  • none : England (E is not used for Foundation callsigns)
  • M : Scotland
  • I : Northern Ireland
  • EI : Ireland
  • W : Wales
  • D : Isle of Man
  • U: Guernsey
  • J : Jersey

Intermediate

Prefix starts:

  • 2#0
  • 2#1

RSLs used are (note ALL RSLs are used, including E for England, where this is not used for Foundation and Full):

  • E : England
  • M : Scotland
  • I : Northern Ireland
  • EI : Ireland
  • W : Wales
  • D : Isle of Man (for Douglas, capital of Isle of Man)
  • U: Guernsey
  • J : Jersey

Full

  • M#0
  • M#5
  • G#0 to G#8

RSLs used are:

  • none : England (E is not used for Full callsigns)
  • M : Scotland
  • I : Northern Ireland
  • EI : Ireland
  • W : Wales
  • D : Isle of Man
  • U: Guernsey
  • J : Jersey

Optional callsign suffixes

/A : used to indicate operating from a different address than your normal station location, if the alternative location has an address

/M : operating mobile, e.g. in a car

/P : away from main station location, but NOT at an address that has a postal address, e.g. if camping in a field

  • note that /P does not include operating an HT when mobile which is /M

Differences between US and UK Amateur Radio license rules and restrictions – part 2

A while back I posted this article about some of the differences I’ve noticed while studying for a UK Amateur Radio license compared to the US license rules. I’ve just come across a few more about geographic restrictions, which are probably amongst the most curious of the license rules.

US Geographic Restrictions

In the US, the Part 97 rules define a couple of geographic areas where you’re not allowed to transmit.

97.303 states:

(m) In the 70 cm band:

(1) No amateur station shall transmit from north of Line A in the 420-430 MHz segment. See §97.3(a) for the definition of Line A.

And defines Line A as:

(30) Line A. Begins at Aberdeen, WA, running by great circle arc to the intersection of 48° N, 120° W, thence along parallel 48° N, to the intersection of 95° W, thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Duluth, MN, thence by great circle arc to 45° N, 85° W, thence southward along meridian 85° W, to its intersection with parallel 41° N, thence along parallel 41° N, to its intersection with meridian 82° W, thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Bangor, ME, thence by great circle arc through the southernmost point of Searsport, ME, at which point it terminates.

The reason for this restriction is that Canada does not allow 70cm Amateur Radio usage between 420-430Mhz and so this corridor along the North US border with Canada and between Alaska and Canada is to prevent interference with other primary users of 420-430MHz.

There are a couple of other location specific restrictions stated in Part 97 for US operators:

(2) Amateur stations transmitting in the 420-430 MHz segment must not cause harmful interference to, and must accept interference from, stations authorized by the FCC in the land mobile service within 80.5 km of Buffalo, Cleveland, and Detroit. See §2.106, footnote US230 for specific frequencies and coordinates.

Since 70cm band usage is on a secondary user basis, restrictions are to prevent interference with primary users in these areas.

The US Part 97 rules also mention restrictions for the National Radio Quiet Zone in Virginia – this location contains the Green Bank Observatory and a Naval Research Station. Part 97.203 mentions restrictions to automated beacon stations in this area.

Another interesting restriction on 70cms is the power restriction to 50w in locations near to particular military bases. Having lived in the Sacramento Valley area, this 70cms restriction is known to the local clubs and operators as a measure to avoid interference within 150 miles of the PAVE PAWS radar at Beale AFB.

UK Geographic Restrictions

I’ve only come across these similar UK restriction so far, stated on the license bandplan:

431 to 432 MHz is not available within 100 km radius of Charing Cross, London

As UK 70cm usage is as a secondary user, this is again to avoid interference to primary users in this band.

On 2m:

Beacons may be established for DF competitions except within 50 km of TA 012869 (Scarborough)

If anyone knows what is specifically at this location leave a comment below, although this RSGB page and map may give some clues since Menwith Hill is also mentioned here as another area with restrictions.

Amateur Radio – remembering Ohm’s Law with the VIR triangle (and the PIV triangle)

For the Amateur Radio license exams (for most countries) you need to remember Ohm’s Law, which is easily remembered by the Ohm’s Law triangle:

 V
I R

where:

V = voltage (volts)

I = current (amps)

R = resistance (ohms)

To calculate any value knowing the other 2, cover the value you need with your finger and then use the remaining calculation, e.g.

V = I x R

I = V / R

Similarly for Power, use the PIV triangle:

 P
I V

where:

P = power (watts)

I = current (amps)

V = voltage (volts)